Hey 2016!

It’s been a minute, but I’m still here. Juggling work, life and culinary school turned out to be more of a challenge than I thought. I finished up last semester and thoroughly enjoyed my 6 week break. The day job got uber crazy around October and is still demanding way too much of my time and energy. The new semester started at the end of January and I’m digging it so far.

I’m enrolled in Cooking II and Advanced Baking. Last week in Cooking class we fabricated fish. All I can say is get to know and love your fish monger! I feel like I smelled like fish guts for two days! I like to think I’m pretty good with a knife based on being a life long crafter, but creating attractive fillets was a challenge. I’ll definitely start purchasing whole fish to get in more practice.

Advanced Baking wasn’t my first choice of a class to take. I actually already have that credit and skill set but needed a class to replace completing an internship. I haven’t been able to locate an entry level job in Frederick that aligns with my food philosophy and schedule. (NOTE: I’m still looking!) It’s been over 10 years since I’ve taking a baking class so I’m really blowing cobwebs off those skills. The class is only 9 students and is supposed to provide students the opportunity to venture into their own interests while addressing the fundamentals being taught. I was VERY excited about this concept until the first day when my instructor made it very clear of his tolerance, or lack there of, of plant-based ingredients in the kitchen when not medically necessitated. We will touch on fat-free and gluten-free baking so there is that. I haven’t decided on if or how much I will challenge him on this in class but do plan to create plant-based versions of whatever we bake in class over the course of the week while at home. Stay tuned.

My personal health and fitness is still a struggle. I’m doing my best to listen to the health coach advice in my head and get back on track. First up is to get rid of as many of the processed convenience foods as I possibly can. To help with that this week I finally purchased a new waffle maker. I’ve been without one for about 2 years. Space is really short in my current kitchen and I didn’t want to spend a lot of money on something that will only get used once or twice a month. I decided on the Cuisinart WMR-CA Round Waffle Maker which I got on sale at Macy’s for around $22. It worked exactly as described and held up well for my multi-grain waffles recipe. I enjoyed one this morning with some turkey bacon. The brown sugar in these waffles produces a nice crip outside and eliminates the need for syrup for me.

Multi-grain Waffles
Print Recipe
{Adapted from Eating Well: Spring 2003, The Essential EatingWell Cookbook (2004)} I haven't tried this batter for pancakes yet, but it should adapt beautifully.
Servings Prep Time
8 waffles (using 1/2 cup of batter each) 20 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
16 minutes (depending on your waffle iron) 15 minutes
Servings Prep Time
8 waffles (using 1/2 cup of batter each) 20 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
16 minutes (depending on your waffle iron) 15 minutes
Multi-grain Waffles
Print Recipe
{Adapted from Eating Well: Spring 2003, The Essential EatingWell Cookbook (2004)} I haven't tried this batter for pancakes yet, but it should adapt beautifully.
Servings Prep Time
8 waffles (using 1/2 cup of batter each) 20 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
16 minutes (depending on your waffle iron) 15 minutes
Servings Prep Time
8 waffles (using 1/2 cup of batter each) 20 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
16 minutes (depending on your waffle iron) 15 minutes
Ingredients
Servings: waffles (using 1/2 cup of batter each)
Instructions
  1. Place flax meal in a small container. Add 6 Tbsp of water to flax meal and mix well. Place container into the refridgerator until needed.
  2. Thin out yogurt with milk (or water). Alternately, if you don't have yogurt you can add 2 Tbsp of vinegar to 2 cups of milk.
  3. Add oats to this mixture and let stand on counter for 15 minutes.
  4. Coat waffle iron with cooking spray or wipe with oil. Preheat your waffle iron according to the manufacturer's instructions.
  5. Whisk flour, cornmeal, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon in a large bowl.
  6. Stir flax mixture, sugar, oil and vanilla into the oat mixture. Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients; mix with a rubber spatula just until moistened.
  7. Spoon in enough batter into the preheated waffle iron to cover one-half to three-fourths of the surface (I used 1/2 cup for an 8-inch round, classic waffle iron). Cook until waffles are crisp and golden brown. Repeat with remaining batter.
Recipe Notes

Wrap any leftovers individually and refrigerate for up to 2 days. Waffles can be individually frozen and kept for up to 1 month. Reheat in a toaster or toaster oven.

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